The Rhyolite Ghost Town

At eh edge of Death Valley National Park and just over the border of Nevada is a place stranger than any we have seen so far.

The mining town of Rhyolite began in 1905, peeked in 1906 and was a ghost town by 1920. The short lived town had electricity, water pipes, a railroad, a hospital, opera house and a stock exchange but the resources were over mined and the town fell as quickly as it rose.

Very little remains of the town of Rhyolite and since it was on the way to Vegas we decided to stop to take some pictures of the crumbling facades as the sun was setting.

We’ve had our tetanus booster.

Ghost towns are certainly a fun and creepy photo op but the Goldwell Open Air Museum stole the show. A group of Belgium artists decided to set up an “art situation” here and they did not disappoint.

I can only assume these giant wooden miner and a penguin is symbolic for something. Maybe it’s his spirit animal or he is daydreaming about snow while working in the Nevada desert.

A miner and his penguin.

The creepiest and most interesting part of the “art situation” are the ghost sculptures. While we don’t believe that ghosts could ever be possible, the hint of human form will give you the feeling that you are not alone here.

A ghost rider.
It’s not easy being invisible.

The Last Super, Matthew for scale
Nothing and no one around for miles and miles.

A waiter offering a drink.

Here is a stone zen labyrinth for contemplation.

You can sit on an over sized mosaic couch  and watch the sun set.

Be careful, it’s sharp.

A sphere with faces on the ground… that is all.

And last but certainly not least, a giant naked blond lady made out of bricks. You really can’t make this stuff up.

I will protect your modesty.

 

Up next, VEGAS BABY!!

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